[DNF]lèche Ride Report: Indians Road and Arroyo Seco

Stokemeter™ warranty department,

Please send five new Stokemeters™ to the below addresses because this ride blew the tops off the current model by multiple orders of magnitude.

Best,

Boyzonthehoods

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I have failed to find appropriate words or phrases to adequately describe my experience of riding Indians Road. For some reason I keep coming back to the term “stoke”, which is bandied about too often and seems such a poor descriptor of emotion and experience, but nevertheless, it’s what I have to work with. I’ve been hearing stories of Indians Road for a good number of years now, ever since my friend Gentle Fred first went on one of the fabled “condor” trips with Cameron Falconer and Rick Hunter. Since then Indians has been on top of my list of roads to ride, but events and logistics have transpired against me being able to put tires to dirt until I was given a season contract with the Boyz fleche team.

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IMG_6459_2Indians is hands down the best road I have ridden. Seriously. Judging from the unending stream of exclamations of amazement and excitement, I can safely say that this sentiment was mirrored by my teammates as well. What else can be said about Indians Road? As Ian said, “…it is perfectly suited for rando bikes!” An opinion seconded not only by every member of the team, but by a mountain biker which we passed on the way down who exclaimed that he wished he had brought HIS rando bike out instead. This road is bananas because it’s in some of the more remote and inaccessible terrain in Central California. Why would someone build this road in the first place? It’s not like it connects anything that worthwhile (the canyon of Arroyo Seco to Fort Hunter Liggett). There also aren’t any noticeable natural resources in these rugged mountains. It happens to be a poor fire road due to it being crazy narrow in places with sheer drops of seemingly thousands of feet off the edge, as well as being blocked by landslides in numerous places. I mean, the road is abandoned, so it’s obviously not that important to the county, state, or federal infrastructure. It seems that the only reason that this road exists is to give those who ride it amazing views and mind-blowing gratifying experiences.

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photo 5Shralping down to the Salinas Valley with Brian, Irving, Ian, and Carlin I realized that Indians Road gave us all an experience that we cannot easily forget or get again. It was a unique and momentous section on an equally unique ride with an amazing group of riders. As Gentle Fred puts it, “It’s god’s country.” Fred’s a physicist, and most likely an atheist so take that for what you will. Steinbeck wrote a short novel, To A God Unknown, set in these mountains. Read it and go ride this road, while keeping Fred’s description in mind when you are out there. Oh, and make sure your stokemeter™ is up to snuff. This road…this road…

Gabe

2 thoughts on “[DNF]lèche Ride Report: Indians Road and Arroyo Seco

  1. I rode Indians Rd in the opposite direction years ago while training for the Tour Divide. I believe our route also came about with the help of Rick Hunter. That road was something special and the part of the ride I think of most.

  2. Pingback: Volunteer Super Randonneur Series – Fort Bragg 600k | Bonk if you don't know Velocio

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